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The Millennials: David Nathan

Journal Staff

David Nathan and his family

NOVEMBER 1, 2018 – NAME: David Nathan, 36

HOMETOWN: Swampscott

CURRENTLY LIVING IN: Swampscott

ALMA MATERS: Swampscott High School ’00, Brandeis University ’04

JOB: Owner of Scaler Marketing

FAVORITE FOOD: I tend to eat a very plant-based, whole-food diet. That being said, I will never tell you that a big, juicy steak is not one of the most delicious things in the world. And I love sushi.

FAVORITE MUSIC: I enjoy classic rock … I definitely have a soft spot for dancehall, reggae, and reggaeton.

FAVORITE BOOKS: “The Magic of Thinking Big,” “The 4-Hour Workweek,” “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” “The Traveler’s Gift.”

FAVORITE MOVIES: Growing up, my favorite movie was always “Ace Ventura: Pet Detective.”

FAVORITE TV SHOWS: My wife has gotten me to watch “The Good Place,” but I haven’t really watched TV shows for like 10 years.

FAVORITE TRAVEL DESTINATION: In Costa Rica … there’s this gorgeous riverbed. … it’s just sitting there waiting for me to come back.

FAVORITE JEWISH PERSON: Rabbi [Lord] Jonathan Sacks.

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WHAT WAS YOUR JEWISH BACKGROUND GROWING UP?

I grew up with a traditional Conservative upbringing – we had a kosher kitchen, I went to Jewish day school, since I was 10, I went to Jewish overnight camps. When Rabbi Yossi [Lipsker] moved to town, we started going to Chabad of the North Shore. My parents are not Orthodox, but the atmosphere spoke to them. I was interested in the Orthodox lifestyle … but it wasn’t until I was maybe 26 that I started to explore my Judaism a little bit more.

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY THAT?

When I was 24, I moved to Aiken, S.C. – it’s basically the Bible Belt, with a church on every corner. When I moved to South Carolina, I always had this feeling like I appreciated a Shabbos dinner, I appreciated a Saturday morning service from time to time, so if I’m gonna be surrounded by churches and devout Christians, I should probably find a shul to be a part of. So there was a Chabad house in Augusta, Ga., and I would go there every once in a while. The more I learned about Jewish values and Jewish ideals … it really started speaking to me.

WHAT IS YOUR JEWISH IDENTITY NOW?

If I had to label myself … I would probably be labeled as Orthodox. I think everybody struggles with these ideas, no matter how religious you are, but I do believe that there is truth to the Torah … we keep fully kosher, we only eat at kosher restaurants, our house is fully kosher, we keep full Shabbos – we don’t break that, we feel that that’s very important to the laws of our children.

WHAT’S IT LIKE TO HAVE TRIPLETS?

When we first found out, it was certainly shocking. It very quickly became reality for us and to this day, it’s all we know. But there are definitely moments like, “We’re gonna need three strollers!” and “We’re gonna need three jackets!” There’s definitely that overwhelming feeling. Even having twins – it would be so easy, you can both hold a baby, and do whatever you want. We definitely joke about that all the time.

CAN YOU TALK ABOUT YOUR CAREER?

I started my own marketing company [called Scaler Marketing]. It’s primarily digital … I believe that the website is the foundation of the business. You can have advertising and social media, but if your website is not strong, in the modern world, that will impact the success of your business. So my job as the marketing consultant and the web designer is to make sure that we know what your website is trying to accomplish, and we do an excellent job of portraying what your value proposition is.

YOUR MOTHER, DEBBIE NATHAN, FOUNDED THE ARTSBRIDGE INSTITUTE. CAN YOU TALK ABOUT THAT?

The goal of Artsbridge is to help anybody who is surrounded by conflict – that could be in the workplace, that could be at home – to help bridge the gap of that conflict to see that there can be a better path, and to see that whoever’s on the other side of this conflict is also a human being with goals and dreams, and those don’t always have to conflict with each other. When [my mom] started, she started with something that was very close to her heart, which was the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. A large part of the program is using art and dialogue to help these kids come together and learn to work with each other, as opposed to constantly seeing the other as the enemy and working against each other.

{ 1 comment… add one }
  • Lynn Nadeau November 1, 2018, 1:46 pm

    Really nice details about a really nice young man

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