Residents toast over dinner at Windsor Place in Wilmington. Photo: Windsor Place of Wilmington

Downsizing, with a personal touch

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Downsizing, with a personal touch

Residents toast over dinner at Windsor Place in Wilmington. Photo: Windsor Place of Wilmington

At Windsor Place of Wilmington, owner Elissa Sargent has a 10-minute rule for resident and family concerns: “Get it done or get back to people in 10 minutes.” Sargent is on-site every day, helping with operations, as she has done for over a decade. “My eyes are open everywhere,” Sargent said. “We have extremely low staff turnover, which is a huge plus in healthcare.”

The personal touch is a highlight of Windsor Place, home to 56 independent and assisted living apartments, as well as 42 memory care units. Another perk: Weekly trips to places that might be just a little too ambitious on one’s own. Recent excursions include a boat ride around Gloucester, a Salisbury beachglass-finding expedition, and a waterfront restaurant in Winthrop-by-the-Sea.

With large homes overlooking conservation land, The Gables of Winchester offers another kind of smooth transition. “For people downsizing from a decent size house, moving into a 350-square-foot room can be tough,” said Gables spokesperson Kristen Woulfe. To ease the move, the Gables offers larger-than-average units, ranging from a 650-square-foot alcove studio – with separate sleeping and living quarters – to 1,100-square-foot two-bedroom apartments featuring multiple walk-in closets. “There’s still room for a queen size bed, a couch, multiple chairs and a dining table,” Woulfe pointed out.

Just like at home, the 123 Gables residences – a mix of independent and assisted living – feature patios where residents can listen to birdsong and tend tomato plants. The difference: At The Gables, it’s a short stroll – not a drive – to the beauty salon, library, happy hour, or even the doctor (who makes home visits). This infrastructure of daily life, explained Woulfe, eases not only the transition from house to apartment, but also to assisted living. “Once you move in, you’re already here if you need more services down the road,” she noted. “It can really feel like home.”

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