Editorial: To our readers – our partners

SHARE THIS STORY

HELP SUPPORT JEWISH JOURNAL

Editorial: To our readers – our partners

The Jewish Journal is one of the last free Jewish papers in America, and we’re still printing and mailing the paper because of you. You are our partners.

We provide a wide-reaching service to thousands of members of the community, and content that you will not find elsewhere. We write about you, and your friends, and your relatives; we write about Jewish institutions such as our temples, JCCs, day schools, Jewish charities, and interfaith programs. We write about breaking news, such as antisemitism and the impact COVID-19 has had on our community. We write about your happy occasions, such as births, weddings and bar and bat mitzvahs. We also honor our loved ones with obituaries that memorialize their lives. We tell these stories, and so many more, in order for you to feel connected.

It’s a symbiotic relationship – we’re partners. We are now the largest Jewish publication and website in New England – we print and mail our publication 30 times a year to more than 10,000 subscribers, and our content on our jewishjournal.org website features the latest local, national and international Jewish news.

We love this relationship, and we are dedicated to bringing you strong journalism and storytelling. Last year, our staff won two national journalism awards from the American Jewish Press Association. On these pages, you will find some articles by some of the finest journalists in the area. They write these stories because they are dedicated to their craft and also to the community.

On page 1 of today’s paper, David Shribman – a North Shore native and Pulitzer Prize winner – submitted a remarkable piece about an incident that impacts all Americans. On the eve of the trial of the alleged gunman who killed 11 Jews in a Pittsburgh synagogue in 2018 – the worst mass shooting in the history of American Jewry – he reports about the impact it has had on the city, the Jewish community, and how residents are dealing with the upcoming trial. This is not a story that would typically appear in a regional Jewish paper, but rather would run on the front page of a major daily. It’s on page 1 of the Journal because Shribman, and so many other contributing writers, care about our readers.

While our journalism is strong, it’s becoming more of a challenge for our business to remain solvent. Here’s a transparent look at our finances: our annual budget is modest – about $700,000. Our staff is also a modest size, along with our salaries. More than half of our funding comes from advertising, and a $46,000 grant from Combined Jewish Philanthropies. That means that each year the Journal has to raise more than $200,000 to break even. Over the past year, the cost of doing business has soared with inflation. Everything from newsprint to mailing costs, to insurance has increased.

And so, we ask you – our readers, our partners – to help support our mission, and allow us to continue to publish stories about members of the community and our valued temples, JCCs, day schools and other nonprofits. At this time, we ask everyone – from community leaders and nonprofits, to subscribers and business owners – to help us meet the challenge of raising $200,000 in the next three months. There are many ways to donate. You can attend our June 7 Honorable Menschions Gala, and also purchase an ad in our tribute book that will be published in our paper and read by over 10,000 subscribers.You can send a donation to The Jewish Journal, PO Box 2089, Salem, MA, 01970. You can also consider a legacy gift through estate planning.

We believe our best journalism is still to come, and we feel connecting and uniting the Jewish and interfaith community is essential for the North Shore and Greater Boston. But we can’t do it alone. We need your help. Please keep our collective mission alive. Θ

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

TOP STORIES

Jewish Journal is reader supported

Jewish Journal is reader supported